Flower Tutorial – Pansies (Part 2): Teacher Thank-you

Cup-with-lidEarlier today, I shared a little tutorial I put together on making paper pansies.  If you can cut out a heart shape, you can handle these!  I also wanted to share with you a project that I actually used one of the pansies on – because the only thing more fun than making a paper flower is putting it to good use!

As a school teacher, I am often asked if I actually like receiving homemade appreciation gifts.  My answer is always the same – absolutely!  I truly appreciate any gift (homemade or other) that I receive from the families that I work with!

This year, one of my students noticed that I liked a particular kind of coffee and took some time before school to pick one up for me.  That gesture meant a lot, and I used it as an inspiration for this project.

Cup-fullAs fun as it would be to drop off a cup of coffee one morning (or an empty cup with a little gift card inside), I love the of embellishing the cup with a custom coffee sleeve to give it that “homemade” feel.  To create this one, I simply took an actually sleeve from a coffee shop, opened it up and used it as a template.  I grabbed a piece of paper from DCWV’s Chalk Fun Stack (because really – is there a better stack than this for a teacher?), some of the corrugated stack (because having that air pocketed paper is not only functional but really cute), and then traced the sleeve onto them, leaving one slightly wider than the other so I could create a layered look.

Because I wasn’t actually sure what size the cup would be, I didn’t glue the sleeve together. Instead, I simply waited until I had the cup and then tied a piece of May Arts ribbon the pieces of cut paper it to hold then in place. Finally, I added a little banner sentiment with a chalk pen, and added one of my paper pansies.  It’s like a bouquet of flowers and a cup of coffee wrapped into one!

If you haven’t checked out the tutorial for the flower on this project, I hope you’ll stay and check it out!  Thanks for stopping by today, and pop back soon – I have another flower tutorial in the works!

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Don’t feel like bringing a cup of coffee? Use the cup as a container for a gift card instead!

 

Flower Tutorial – Pansies (Part 1)

bothOne of my most popular posts here at SCS is a paper flower tutorial for roses, so you might already know that I love making paper flowers.  I thought it was time to put another one (or two) together for you!  So today, I am going to show you how to create some great spring pansies – and the only thing you need is paper, adhesive and some scissors.  No fancy cutting machines or punches required!

The other day, I was looking at some pictures of pansies, and I was struck by the simple and very predictable shapes of the blooms!  In fact, they reminded me a lot of hearts, so if you can cut out a heart shape, you can make these too!  Here we go!

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 Start with some medium weight cardstock in two tints or shades of the same colour. I used some of the gorgeous colours from DCWV’s Jewel Color Stack.  While you’re at it, grab a great pair of scissor and some adhesive.  I like using a liquid adhesive for flowers because it gives me time to modify the placement of petals, and once it’s dry, the petals are not going anywhere!

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Okay. now decide if you would like the darker or lighter of your two papers for the front three petals.  For this raspberry coloured pansy, I decided to work with the darker colour in the front, and the lighter one for the back petals.  Fold your cardstock over about 1″.  If you have a scoring board – great use it!  But do not be deterred if you do not – I didn’t use mine at all for this flower.

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Now, think back to your school Valentine day projects, and cut a simple half heart shape, lining up the middle of the heart with the fold line.  To keep the proportions right for the flower, aim for a heat that is as wide as it tall.  For this one – short and wide hearts are going to work the best!

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Using your first one as a tracer, cut two more. I simply placed the cut out one on top of the folded paper and cut around it, but feel free to trace it first and then cut if that makes you more comfortable.

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Place one of your cut out hearts on top of the other piece of cardstock you have chosen – the lighter one for me!  Trace a simple oval shape that is slightly taller than your heat, but about half as wide.  Don’t worry about this part being perfect.  I didn’t do any measuring here – just give yourself a bit of a guide to work with.

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Cut 2! You’ll notice that these shapes are not perfectly symmetrical – in fact, I flipped one to give it more of an organic look.  Remember, petals on flowers are all different, so dips and indents around the edges will actually help to make your flower look more realistic.

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Using some scrap black or dark paper, cut a circle. Don’t worry too much about the size – just make sure it is at least an inch so you have enough room to glue the petals without having to fiddle too much.

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Add a circle of adhesive around the edge of the circle.  Starting with your two oval shaped petals, press them into the adhesive, slightly overlapping one on top of the other.

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Now take your heart-shaped petals and place one on each side, making sure that these sit on top of the two oval shaped petals.

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Finally, place the last heart-shaped petal over top of the other two – wiggle the petals around a bit until they seem evenly spaced.  Now wait!  This is a hard part, but try not to touch the bloom or move it around until your adhesive is dry.  Yup – completely dry!  But I have something for you to do in the meantime…

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Take some more of the black paper, and cut a heart shape that is half the height of your heart petals and then rough up the top edge.  Some pansies actually have a dark pattern that almost looks like a heart, so if the random cutting along the top scares you a bit, simply cut a heart shape.  It will work just as well!  Cut 3.

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Using some more liquid adhesive, glue the dark shapes in place.  I actually fold the dark pieces down the middle to make it easier to place them in the fold line on the petal.  Again, wait until the pieces are dry before you continue.

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Last but not least, get a bit rough with the bloom!  If you have waited until it is dry, you will be amazed by how tough it is!  Place your thumb in the middle of the bloom and pull the petals upward – that will create a slight bell shape, and will give the pansy some dimension.

Voila, that is it!

Here’s an example of another pansy I created with purple – the only difference here being that I used yellow paper to create my circle to create a bit of contrast with the purple petals.

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Well, I hope you are inspired to create some paper flowers, especially if they are not yet growing in your own garden!  Thanks for stopping by, and stay tuned for a post later tonight on a little project I created with one of these pansies!

Thanks for stopping by!

 

 

 

Chick it out!

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I have a little more Easter fun to share with you today!  I love putting together little treat containers for the holidays, and when I found pastel coloured candy corn at Bulk Barn, I knew I had to pull something together.  Last year, I worked on a fun, bunny take out container, so this year, I thought it would be fun to create a chick!

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Now, I cannot tell you how easy these are to make.  In fact, if you take the cover by itself, you could have fun packaging in Easter-themed colours in less than 3 minutes each!  Really!  Chick it out! ;)

Step 1

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Start by cutting a strip of paper that is 12″ x 4″ wide.  I used DCVW’s Bohemian Sunrise stack for this one – it has all sorts of great colours for Easter!
Oh, and you can actually take the 4″ width and change that to match any little plastic bag that you would like to use for your treats! If you would like, cut a curve on one end (I just did this free hand).

Lay your strip on the scoring board with the curved end on the far end of your board.  Score at 4 1/2″, 5 1/2″, 10″.  Use your scoring tool to firm up all your folds.

Step 2

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Turn over your paper to the wring side, and line up the top of your treat bag with the non- curved edge. Staple in place. Don’t worry about seeing the staples as they will get covered in the next step.

Step 3

Side view

 

This is the easiest step! Simply fold your packaging around the treat back, pulling the curved edge up on over top of the staples.

Step 4

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Use a small strip or piece of adhesive to hold the flap down.  I use the Tombow adhesive because even though it hold really well, the small piece will release when pulled up without ripping the paper part.

Step 5

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Have fun embellishing your packaging!  I turned them into chicks with some simple shapes cut from some orange patterned paper, and then adding some little wings (they actually look really cute without the wings too). I also decided to add some fun May Arts ribbon to a few!

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All in all, I think these cute little chicks will be a fun Easter treat! Hopefully they inspire you to get crafty!

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Thanks for stopping by!

 

Spring into Easter

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The other day, I was thinking about playing with some of the great textured papers from DCWV, included the fun printed cork and the beautiful coloured burlap sheets.  I figured that an Easter banner would be a nice way to brighten up these dreary spring days, but I figured that if I put in all that work, it was a shame to only be able to have it up for a couple of days.  Then it hit me – why not make a double sided banner?!

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In fact, “SPRING” and “EASTER” turned out to be the perfect match! :)  I did play with the patterns a bit – using the same pattern in different colours for the Easter side, and mixing up the patterns for the Spring side.  I also embellished each side a bit differently just for some variety.

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Just a note – when I first envisioned this banner, I had actually planned to add a few 3D flowers.  But as I started creating, I realized that because the banner was double sided, I really needed to keep both sides quite flat so the banner would hang properly.  I am actually really glad that I went clean and simple.  There is so much great texture going on with these supplies, and I think it really keeps that at the forefront.  And anyway, spring here in Canada is pretty bare bones, so it works well! ;)

Well, that’s it for me!  I promised Easter projects and I do have more for you (including a cute little treat container), so be sure to come by again this week!

Thanks for stopping by!

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